Move Up In Your Career With a Resume That Says "Can Do!"


Do your career ambitions include a promotion to greater responsibilities? Are your efforts to move into management getting you no where in the job market? You are not alone. One of the most common career challenges is moving up the corporate ladder. As a career coach, one of the most frequently asked questions I get is "how can I make my resume convince employers I can do the job when I don't have management experience?"

Let me share with you three tips for transforming your resume into a tool to help you move up in your career.

  1. Emphasize strategic activities.

    Transitioning into management generally means going from tactical responsibilities to strategic planning. Meaning those in management plan the work of others. Employers want to know how closely you have been involved with strategic activities. Perhaps you've worked with a team that came up with strategic solutions. Maybe you've assisted your boss in devising a better way of doing something. It could be that you took initiative to develop a more efficient system of operations. Use these examples in your resume to show that you understand what it takes to be a strategic thinker.
  2. Emphasize your accomplishments.

    Employers are always looking for individuals with drive and initiative to promote into management roles. What better way to illustrate your potential than through your accomplishments. Think back on the challenges you've met on the job. What problems did you fix? How did you contribute to corporate bottom-line objectives? Can you prove your worth by the time you've saved or the costs you've cut or procedures you've streamlined? How well have you contributed to the income or revenue growth of your company? These are issues on the minds of all hiring managers. Include accomplishments in your resume that illustrate your ability to solve the problems of potential employers.
  3. Emphasize your leadership skills.

    The hallmark of great management is the ability to lead others. You don't have to have had the role of manager to have opportunities to lead. Challenges represent opportunity to exercise leadership. Anytime you were able to motivate others, you practiced leadership. Mentoring is another example of leadership. Training others is yet another form of leading. Taking part in a team that solved significant problems is a great way to show your leadership potential.

So, you see, there are many ways to illustrate in your resume your ability, skills and drive toward management. Remember, employers look for potential as well as actual management experience. Write your resume with these three tips in mind and you'll soon see career growth opportunities knocking at your door.
Deborah Walker
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
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Deborah Walker, CCMC is a Career Coach helping job seekers compete in the toughest job market. Her clients gain top performing skills in resume writing, interview preparation and salary negotiation. Read more job-search tips and see sample resumes at:
http://www.AlphaAdvantage.com