Who is your inner critic? You know, that little voice in your head that says things like "you'll never hit your target this month" or "I told you so" or "you never were any good at presentations". We all have an inner voice. Your inner voice is effectively your unconscious mind and its primary function is to look after you and keep you safe, though it doesn't always feel that way does it? It's great when your inner voice is saying positive and empowering things to you. However, on many occasions, when it's actually trying to protect you, it can seem as if it's sabotaging you. Whose voice is it?

Whether your job is selling, or managing those that do sell, or a combination of the two, there's a fair chance you're working long hours. Maybe too long? Are you spending long hours on motorways way after 7pm driving to and from meetings? Are you burning the midnight oil draped over a laptop with a strong coffee trying to get everything done? Maybe both? How can you be brilliant at selling and managing in this state?

You can have the greatest sales people on the planet, but if you're leaking customers through poor customer service, your balance sheet will suffer. And the cost of acquiring new customers usually far outweighs that of keeping existing customers. Surely it's much more preferable to keep more of those customers you have? For me, every company should realise that their ultimate sustainability depends on their ability to generate consistent excellent service that keeps customers coming back and singing their praises. Yet 77% of customers say that if they experience poor service, they would avoid using that company again where there is another option available...

Did you know that, without meaning to, you're turning away up to 40% of your potential customers? Let me explain. In a nutshell, when choosing products or services, your customers will be motivated by one of two things; pleasure or pain. Never is the pain and pleasure principle more apparent than in the selling arena. What about your customers?

Influence is the key to achieve sales success for individual performers or when leading a sales team. This article provides practical tips on how to increase sales and profitability whether you work at a retail car dealership or sell B2B products and services.

The strengths of introverts vary but most have common traits. They are successful and they are proud of their accomplishments. Acknowledge their success and take an interest in helping them grow their business or solve a problem. And, while this may be difficult, do not oversell them or appear in a rush to get the order. You are building a relationship to nurture well after the sale is complete.

Being judged even when you don't say a word. Your staff, your colleagues, your customers, your potential customers, even your family are all forming a view of you -- even when you haven't spoken. Because you're still communicating.

Charisma DeZonie isn't just selling you coffee. She's selling you a lifestyle, and with Organo Gold as her home-based business of choice, she's on a mission to caffeinate and transform the entire world.

Have you ever felt weird in your business environment, like you don't fit in? Do you hear people (or your manager) saying to you that you need to change, to speak up, to speak louder and be more assertive? Have you ever been labeled "shy" when you're really just introverted?

No. No way. In fact our own weekly enewsletter (thank you for reading this!) goes from strength to strength. That's if your measurement criteria for a successful newsletter includes the number of those signing up to receive it, the numbers opening it, the numbers reading it -- and the amount of favourable comments received. Oh and the number of enquiries we receive through it too. Yes, actual leads each week, even though we don't promote anything within the newsletter (ok then maybe a teeny weeny bit at the bottom sometimes!) So I remain convinced that a company newsletter could be a very powerful contributor to helping your company achieve its strategic goals. Fundamental rules of newsletters...