As we move towards the close of 2019, it's a good time to reflect on your leadership and the impact that you've had on your team. This is a time to celebrate successes, own your unhelpful thoughts/behaviours and plan how you want to be going forward.

Over the many years of working with Sales Teams, I've noticed the following ratio at almost every company... Roughly 10% of the team are top performers and are amazing regardless of the quality of leadership they receive because they rarely need it. Roughly 10% of the team are under performers. No matter what you do to help them it never quite works out for them. Then there's roughly 80% of the team who are there or there abouts.

This week I went back to the gym after a break of over 2 weeks. You've probably guessed that after my weight training session on Monday my muscles were a bit sore. I was back in the gym for another weight training session on Wednesday and whilst I was still sore my session actually improved the muscle ache. This got me thinking...when you don't use muscles, they become less capable of lifting heavy weights. This is true not only for physical muscles but for mental muscles too.

When I work with Sales Leaders the conversation ultimately turns to what they don't get around to doing with their sales team. Most of the activities are really important and the Sales Leader knows that. Is it not enough time? Is it procrastination? Or is it simply avoidance? Mostly it's avoidance because the activity generates negative feelings...and with negative mindset comes avoidance.

Thinking like an elephant is more common than you realise. Last week I shared my thoughts on your automatic patterns as a Sales Leader. Today I want to share how these patterns are created...and how that relates to thinking like an elephant.

Your psychological patterns as a Sales Leader are automatic. They spring into action whenever a specific trigger occurs. They will vary dependant on the specific situation you are in...for example, your automatic patterns when with your top performers could be very different when with your under-performers.

It's easy to consider your most challenging sales person a thorn in your side but these people often give us the biggest opportunity to develop your leadership skills.

Resetting yourself is an important aspect of Sales Leadership if you are to perform at your very best. Your nervous system will only take so much pressure, stress, challenge, trauma and any other demands you have to deal with on a daily basis.

We have greater access to personal development information than ever before...how to do practically anything you want, easier, quicker and more effectively.

How often do you reflect as a Sales Leader? Practically every one of my clients work at high speed...travelling fast on the surface of everything...thinking fast, acting fast, communicating fast. Fast, fast, fast.