When I work with Sales Leaders the conversation ultimately turns to what they don't get around to doing with their sales team. Most of the activities are really important and the Sales Leader knows that. Is it not enough time? Is it procrastination? Or is it simply avoidance? Mostly it's avoidance because the activity generates negative feelings...and with negative mindset comes avoidance.

Thinking like an elephant is more common than you realise. Last week I shared my thoughts on your automatic patterns as a Sales Leader. Today I want to share how these patterns are created...and how that relates to thinking like an elephant.

Your psychological patterns as a Sales Leader are automatic. They spring into action whenever a specific trigger occurs. They will vary dependant on the specific situation you are in...for example, your automatic patterns when with your top performers could be very different when with your under-performers.

It's easy to consider your most challenging sales person a thorn in your side but these people often give us the biggest opportunity to develop your leadership skills.

Resetting yourself is an important aspect of Sales Leadership if you are to perform at your very best. Your nervous system will only take so much pressure, stress, challenge, trauma and any other demands you have to deal with on a daily basis.

We have greater access to personal development information than ever before...how to do practically anything you want, easier, quicker and more effectively.

How often do you reflect as a Sales Leader? Practically every one of my clients work at high speed...travelling fast on the surface of everything...thinking fast, acting fast, communicating fast. Fast, fast, fast.

One of the biggest barriers I come across in sales is the lack of self-belief. It doesn't matter how much good stuff the person has achieved on the outside because if they feel negatively about themselves on the inside they will end up sabotaging themselves simply to prove themselves right.

Sales Leadership has evolved to be a very different function since I was promoted to Sales Manager in the 80's. Back then you could simply focus on the numbers and tell your team what you expected of them. You gave them training to bridge any gaps and they just went off and got on with it.

Often Sales Leaders mistake being a good role model for great sales leadership. Being a good role model simply educates your sales team how you do things that work. It gives them strategies to try out for themselves. It's an important part of your role...especially for new recruits. You already know that all sales people have their own personality traits and require different approaches to develop, inspire and motivate them to perform well.