Sales Coaching: What You Focus on is What You Experience


I know what you're thinking: "This is supposed to be an article on sales, not on psychological mumbo-jumo." But just stay with me for four more sentences and I'll show you why your focus has a tremendous impact on your sales performance.

Sentence One: Let's say that you are going to spend tomorrow prospecting for business and are planning on calling 30 net-new prospects that you have never spoken to before.

Sentence Two: Since we are already assuming, let's say that you believe that cold calling is an intrusion of your prospects time and you fully expect to be greeted as an interruption.

Sentence Three: If you stopped right before you started making your calls and began thinking, "I have some information that is very valuable and can make a very positive impact to everyone I speak with during my call-block."

Sentence Four: If your focused shifted from you being an interruption to you having important and relevant information before you started prospecting, wouldn't you agree that your results will be different?

When you focus on a positive instead of a negative, you free your mind and resources up so that you can better respond to customer questions, objections and buying signals. When you start from a position of strength instead of from a position of weakness, your skills and natural talents are free to shine.

How to Control Your Focus

It's amazing how simple it is to change what you focus on and even more amazing that more people don't already know this.

The questions you ask yourself will ultimately determine what you will focus on.


Think about it, you spend a majority of your days asking yourself questions. Some questions are empowering and some bring you down. If you were to decide to become more aware of the questions you ask yourself and then changed your disempowering questions into empowering ones, what do you think it would do to every aspect of your life? And if you are enjoying improvement in your life, don't you think that those improvements will positively affect your performance in your sales position?

Practice Your Self-Questions

Once you start to become aware of how many questions you ask yourself in a given day, you'll be curious about how to create a habit of asking more positive questions than negative ones. The good news is that awareness is often curative.

By this I mean that if your self-asked questions are making you focus on things that you know that will not increase the quality of your life, you will become aware of them when asked and will make you re-think the question. And, in my experience, a re-thought and re-phrased question usually results in a better, more life-enhancing question.

Lastly, let me ask you a question: "What happens when someone (or you) ask you a question?"

The answer to my question is that you answer, to the best of your abilities, the question. Pretty simple, huh? The truth is that you almost always answer a question asked of you, whether from yourself or from someone else. If the question is empowering, the answer will, most likely, be empowering.

Which produces a better answer to these self-asked questions and which will improve that which you focus on"

"Why do I have to prospect when I know that no one wants to talk to me? or "How can deliver maximum value to everyone whom I call today?"

Still don't think that your questions determine what you focus on and that what you focus on is what you experience?

Why?







Thomas Phelps
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
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Thomas Phelps is a professional life coach, focusing on small business owners, sales professionals and entrepreneurs. As a small business owner, Phelps works with clients around the world, providing both coaching and professional writing services.

Phelps is the creator of the "Essential Needs Sales Model" and has crafted a unique and highly effective sales coaching practice that helps turn struggling professionals into top achievers.

As a professional writer, Phelps has written countless articles on sales, management, personal development, business ownership and the pursuit of success. He is the Guide for Sales Careers on About.com, sales expert and featured author for the National Association of Sales Professionals (www.nasp.com) and works with businesses of all sizes in crafting compelling content that delivers results.

He is the author of two fiction novels and has ghost written two books for well known leaders in the personal development industry.